Arms

Japan and Vietnam: Asia’s Overlooked Friendship

When the news cycle is dominated by North Korea’s nuclear weapons program and China’s resurgence, it’s often easy to forget that there are other major players in East Asia. Two, Japan and Vietnam, have quietly been increasing their economic and military co-operation. After the United States’ long-standing arms embargo on …

Read More »

The persecution of the Rohingya in Myanmar

On August 25, 2017, a small faction of Rohingya militants known as the Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army (ARSA) carried out an attack on three border posts in the Rakhine state, leaving twelve police officers dead. This prompted a brutal government-approved military retaliation, which in turn led to the outbreak of …

Read More »

Remembering the Man who Prevented World War III

Can one man save the world? The late Soviet officer Stanislav Petrov, whose death took place in September, seems to have done exactly that. His calm calculations combined with his instinct probably saved the world from a Third World War and a subsequent nuclear Armageddon. It can be argued that this …

Read More »

How does the United States shoot down a nuclear missile?

IT IS SAID that the late leader of the Soviet Union, Nikita Khrushchev, once warned that in the scenario of a nuclear war, “the survivors will envy the dead”. Nonetheless, on July 4th, North Korea tested its first Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM) which, if successful, could reach the United States …

Read More »

Abe’s Dream Constitution: End of the Security Dilemma or Something More?

This year marks the 70th anniversary of Japan’s post-war constitution, in effect since 1947. Rather than celebrate the success of this constitution, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe shocked Japan and its neighboring countries by making a bold promise to revise Japan’s constitution. Abe chose the year 2020 as a goal for implementing the new …

Read More »

Guns Don’t Kill People: The Case of Switzerland

When a disgruntled gun owner opened fire inside a regional parliament in 2001, it was the first mass shooting in Switzerland’s modern history. Fourteen people were killed, and another fourteen injured, all with standard issue weapons kept by many Swiss people at home. Despite the overall high gun ownership in …

Read More »

Caging the Russian Bear – are NATO and the EU playing a dangerous game?

This article is a part of The Perspective’s Open Mind Theme week. The aim of this week is to broaden perspectives and reveal new angles of subjects you may have thought were crystal clear. The views expressed here do not necessarily represent the views of The Perspective or the Association of Foreign Affairs …

Read More »

High Ambitions: Superpowers and the Weaponization of Outer Space

When Churchill in 1940 boasted that the British would never surrender, it was enough to beat your enemies at sea, in the air, in the fields and in the streets. This has been true for a very long time, and for most of the world, war is still something that …

Read More »

When Football led to War

On the 26th of March, El Salvador will welcome Honduras to Estadio Cuscatlán for a football qualifier, which both sides hope eventually will lead to the 2018 World Cup in Russia. The neighbouring countries have faced off against each other 60 times in the past, but three games in 1969 …

Read More »

Turkey’s role in the Middle East – The return of the Ottomans or just a merchant of death?

Since the beginning of the fighting in Syria in 2011, Turkey has been determined to remove the government of Bashar al-Assad. The explicit goal was to install a Sunni led government in Damascus. This in turn implied a departure from the “zero problems with neighbours” policy doctrine in Turkey, dating …

Read More »