Arms

Three Years of Feminist Foreign Policy – What Difference Does It Make?

On the third of October 2014, Sweden made history. In a surprisingly sunny Stockholm, the newly appointed Minister of Foreign Affairs, Margot Wallström, proclaimed the first explicitly feminist foreign policy in the world. This subject was nothing new for the minister, who had recently served as the Special Representative of …

Read More »

Mr Al-Sisi, we need to talk about human rights

Since taking power in 2013, the president of Egypt, Abd al-Fattah al-Sisi has been criticised for violent repressions of oppositions and of minorities. Despite the protests of human rights organizations, he continues to seem untouchable. Egypt has been exposed to multiple political changes since the Revolution began in Tahrir Square …

Read More »

Japan and Vietnam: Asia’s Overlooked Friendship

When the news cycle is dominated by North Korea’s nuclear weapons program and China’s resurgence, it’s often easy to forget that there are other major players in East Asia. Two, Japan and Vietnam, have quietly been increasing their economic and military co-operation. After the United States’ long-standing arms embargo on …

Read More »

The persecution of the Rohingya in Myanmar

On August 25, 2017, a small faction of Rohingya militants known as the Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army (ARSA) carried out an attack on three border posts in the Rakhine state, leaving twelve police officers dead. This prompted a brutal government-approved military retaliation, which in turn led to the outbreak of …

Read More »

Remembering the Man who Prevented World War III

Can one man save the world? The late Soviet officer Stanislav Petrov, whose death took place in September, seems to have done exactly that. His calm calculations combined with his instinct probably saved the world from a Third World War and a subsequent nuclear Armageddon. It can be argued that this …

Read More »

How does the United States shoot down a nuclear missile?

IT IS SAID that the late leader of the Soviet Union, Nikita Khrushchev, once warned that in the scenario of a nuclear war, “the survivors will envy the dead”. Nonetheless, on July 4th, North Korea tested its first Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM) which, if successful, could reach the United States …

Read More »

Abe’s Dream Constitution: End of the Security Dilemma or Something More?

This year marks the 70th anniversary of Japan’s post-war constitution, in effect since 1947. Rather than celebrate the success of this constitution, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe shocked Japan and its neighboring countries by making a bold promise to revise Japan’s constitution. Abe chose the year 2020 as a goal for implementing the new …

Read More »

Guns Don’t Kill People: The Case of Switzerland

When a disgruntled gun owner opened fire inside a regional parliament in 2001, it was the first mass shooting in Switzerland’s modern history. Fourteen people were killed, and another fourteen injured, all with standard issue weapons kept by many Swiss people at home. Despite the overall high gun ownership in …

Read More »

Caging the Russian Bear – are NATO and the EU playing a dangerous game?

This article is a part of The Perspective’s Open Mind Theme week. The aim of this week is to broaden perspectives and reveal new angles of subjects you may have thought were crystal clear. The views expressed here do not necessarily represent the views of The Perspective or the Association of Foreign Affairs …

Read More »

High Ambitions: Superpowers and the Weaponization of Outer Space

When Churchill in 1940 boasted that the British would never surrender, it was enough to beat your enemies at sea, in the air, in the fields and in the streets. This has been true for a very long time, and for most of the world, war is still something that …

Read More »